Tamarillo or not Tamarillo?

 

That’s the question.  We have just discovered a plant in the garden: long soft ovate leaves and elongated yellow fruits with the feel and structure of apples – even the same taste as I threw caution to the wind and ate one.  The plant finder App pronounced tamarillo (also known as the tree tomato).    But great friend and gardening researcher Elaine re-posted that they are the fruits of the passion flower: cause stomach upsets if eaten when still yellow rather than the golden peachy colour they should achieve when ripe.  I have no idea where the well-established shrub sprang from and why it has chosen to fruit this year or what it really is.  Any suggestions very welcome please.

This week I was finding a use for last year’s crop of chilli peppers.  They have been drying for many months so, once topped and tailed and de-seeded, I ground them with dried rosemary from the garden, dried thyme and powdered garlic.

A simple potato recipe for the mix:

Slice potatoes into thick slices (about 0.5 cm thick).

Throw the slices in to a bowl with a good grinding of black pepper, half a teaspoonful or so of salt, a teaspoon of the chilli/herb mix plus a good tablespoonful or two of olive oil.

Mix with your hands so that every surface of potato is covered.

Lay out on parchment paper and cook for about 45 minutes at Gas 4, turning the slices over after about 30 minutes.

Utterly delicious!

The potatoes were dished up with a roast chicken cooked the Heston way: soaked overnight in a litre of water plus 60g salt, slices of lemon and herbs.  Next day, drain, put the lemon slices inside the chicken and put into a roasting tin in the oven at the lowest heat.  The key piece of equipment is a thermometer (mine talks) and, after three or so hours, check that the temperature of the thickest piece of thigh has reached 70C (put it back in the oven if not hot enough).  When you are satisfied with the temperature, remove the chicken from the oven and cover with foil and a kitchen towel (the cotton sort).  Let it rest for about 45 minutes (while you cook the potatoes).

Turn the oven up to the highest temperature and remove all the coverings from the chicken – cook it for 10 minutes to produce a crisp, brown skin.

Serve everything with vegetables: easy roast chicken lunch.

And, while I was making this, I also cooked apple, date and walnut chutney using the same proportions and method as the damson version (posted a few weeks ago) – excellent.

(Plus, an apple crumble and a rhubarb and ginger (crystallised) crumble – a busy morning in the kitchen.  My crumble mix uses oats, brown sugar, crushed hazelnuts and butter – I prefer it to the flour version.

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

Digging out dinner guests

Guests lost in the jungle and bogged down in mud was the drama of my second dinner service at Noam’s HiR restaurant in Tamarindo, Costa Rica.  Although late, dinner succeeded and you can see how I turned classic Victoria sponges in to more exotic desserts with chilli and coriander https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyAYELsPtgo

In the rainy season, the jungle roads are treacherous with pot holes, mud and torrents of water.  Our missing dinner guests were marooned only a few hundred yards away but their car was stuck in the mud.  Chef Noam dashed out with other guests in tow.    He was as handy with a pick-axe as with his chef’s knife and, within minutes, they soggily joined the party.  This was service with a difference!  As they say in Costa Rica, Pura vida – the answer to everything.

This whole week had been wonderful for discovering new foods growing wild in the jungle:

  • Okinawa spinach – green on one side and purple on the other.
  • Mayan tree spinach – which is toxic when uncooked.
  • Turmeric plants with large leaves – just dig out some roots to use.
  • Ginger plants with thin strap leaves for a light ginger taste and the roots/bulbs of ginger emerging from underground and to be cut.

And every home needs cleaner ants.  They rid houses of other insects and animals.  But they do bite humans too.  They don’t eat our food but will get rid of cockroaches and even something as large as a scorpion.  So you need to know which ant is which and keep the good ones.

Penny

Easy low fat lunch.

Watch me make them on You Tube and you can find the recipe here.

Just a posh version of chicken nuggets and chips.

Oven-cooking is much safer than frying – and keeps the amount of oil to a minimum.

Make your own breadcrumbs from dry stale bread and store in the freezer.

Penny Melville-Brown OBE

Disability Dynamics ltd www.disabilitydynamics.co.uk

Helping disabled people to work since 2000

penny@bakingblind.com

Posh chicken nuggets and chips

Posh chicken nuggets and chips