There’s at least a billion of us!

A little video about the months and years surviving life-changing injuries on top of blindness: https://youtu.be/T_oQCLQyUpE

I’ve also just talked to George who is the leading light of blind cricket in India – here’s a link to the podcast: https://anchor.fm/eyeway/episodes/Eyeway-Conversations-with-Penny-Melville-Brown-e1avb82

You’ve guessed why I’m focussing on disability: about 20% of the world population is like me and 3 December is our International Day.

I wonder if the powers-that-be, the Governments, businesses, employers, IT developers and the global economic system remember that 1-in-5 of us have impairments.

Anyone trying to get through the financial impact of the pandemic would do well to remember the enormous potential of all of us shoppers and workers.   We could make all the difference.   Let’s de-bunk the perceptions that having a disability instantly renders you poor (not worth selling to) and incompetent (not worth employing).   I’m neither and nor are the thousands of other people I’ve met around the world over very many years.   This is a market and pool of talent that is ripe for the picking and the timing is perfect too.

Meanwhile, here’s a little recipe to spice up those autumn pears:

6-8 pears, cored and cut into chunks.

8 pieces crystallised ginger, chopped.

1 orange, juice only.

3 eggs, weighed.

Same weight butter, honey and self-raising flour.

2 heaped teaspoons ground ginger.

 

Place the pears, crystallised ginger and orange juice in an ovenproof dish.

Whizz the butter and honey in a food processor.

Add the eggs to the mix one at a time with a little flour.

Pulse in the last of the flour and ground ginger.

Pour the mix over the pears and cook in a pre-heated oven at 180C, Gas 4 for 40 minutes.

 

Hot and warming for chilly winter days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer perfection: a good read and ice-cream

Crime fiction, thrillers and spy stories have tended to feature in my book reviews for RNIB.   Not the most literary or spiritually uplifting but great for relaxing in the sun (when it shows its face again).

My latest selection goes live on RNIB Connect radio from 1300 on Friday 9 July – just click  https://audioboom.com/posts/7898711-alex-michaelides-kate-london-penny-melville-brown

I’ve also been telling the international audience of the British Forces Broadcasting Service https://fb.watch/v/9uSZ3flrF/

about next Monday’s 1030 (London time) live on-line bake-in: the 9-minute microwave ginger cake.

https://www.facebook.com/events/806006046955175

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/baking-session-for-visually-impaired-people-ginger-cake-tickets-160566860803

This honey and ginger ice-cream is the perfect accompaniment for both the good book and the cake.   It grew from a Heston Blumenthal recipe: substituting honey for sugar to give more flavour and slightly changing the consistency.   Ideal for those who can’t eat eggs and very easy.   Keeping the pieces of ginger as a topping avoids overwhelming the subtle honey flavour.

My venerable and elderly ice-cream maker has an integral refrigeration unit.  But you could part-freeze the mix for an hour or so before whisking the semi-frozen mix to break up the ice crystals and returning to the freezer.

 

840g double or whipping cream.

360g whole milk.

200g honey (we use our own).

35g semi-skimmed milk powder.

3 teaspoons vanilla paste.

Pinch of salt.

2 handfuls crystallised ginger, chopped.

 

Simply place all the ingredients except the ginger in a pan and gently heat until all is dissolved and mixed.   Briefly bring to boiling point.

Chill for at least two hours (or overnight).

Churn and top with the chopped ginger before serving or placing in the freezer.

How’s that for simple?