Desserts from leftovers

 

Another week of culinary experiments – it is good to have the leisure with lock-down.

Firstly, I’m proud to report that the sous chef’s panettoni was magnificent on the second try and made full use of the faffing candied Seville orange peel from a few weeks ago.

 

But it did produce spare egg whites and I’d already done macaroons last time.  I made up this chocolate mousse dessert with what was to hand including some rather mature 70% cocoa solids chocolate that had developed a bloom (not mould but just the surface discolouring).  I used cream to replace the egg yolks and, only having single cream, three threw in some milk powder.  Thanks to a super American cup measure, it is easy for me to put the ingredients together when using American measures in recipes:

 

200g dark chocolate.

1 cup single cream.

1/3 cup milk powder.

3 egg whites.

 

Very gently heat the chocolate, cream and milk powder in a pan until the chocolate has melted and all the ingredients can be mixed together.  Allow to cool.

Whisk the egg whites to stiff peak.

Place a quarter of the egg whites in a bowl and fold in the chocolate mix.

Add a further quarter of the egg whites and fold in.  Repeat twice.

Place the mousse mix in containers and chill for at least 12 hours.

I made four huge servings – these amounts would really do 6-8 of normal size.

 

I wanted to use more of the spare single cream so knocked up some very simple egg custards to turn in to crème brulée using the trusty sous-vide.

 

2 eggs.

¼ cup sugar.

1 cup single cream.

1/3 cup milk powder.

½ teaspoon vanilla bean paste.

Small pinch salt.

 

 

Place all the ingredients in a jug and whizz with a wand-blender for one minute.

Pour the mix in to bottling jars (the sort with rubber seals and clips or screw tops).

Place in a sous-vide water bath, covered with water and cook at 81.5C for an hour.

Chill and turn out on to a plate.

Top with a little caster sugar and caramelise with a blowtorch (others with no sight like me may care to entrust this bit to the sous chef).

Serve with some fresh fruit to pretend it is healthy.

These quantities made 4 servings (normal size!) but we ate them before remembering to take a picture.

 

 

 

 

 

Too many cooks?

 

No, it was super to be doing another on-line cook-in  this week  https://youtu.be/4lkmaV_8Yx0 -mainly people from Hampshire but also drop-ins from India and Holland.

We were doing the excellent ginger biscuits which seemed to work for most people but one thought there was too much spice.  Another had probably got the proportions a bit awry and ended up with rather a sticky mix and enormous biscuits (more like brandy snaps).  Hopefully, we will be doing some more sessions in the future.

Yes, there were too many cooks a little later as I started on the washing -up: good squeeze of Fairy and hot water pouring in only to discover that the sous-chef had already filled the bowl with spinach leaves for lunch!  It took a lot of rinses to remove the lingering lemon fragrance and bubbles – one way of making sure that the Covid virus hadn’t strayed in!

We’ve been counting how many different plant foods we eat after hearing Professor Tim Spector on the radio (The Spark on BBC R4 29 January for those using BBC Sounds https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000rlpz ).  He’s a whizz on gut flora and fauna: the basis of good health, diet and weight-loss.  Thirty different plant-based foods a week sounds a lot until you count garlic, herbs, rice and more.    Yesterday, we gleefully achieved 30 in one day, thanks to simple roast vegetables (and feel so much better and virtuous for doing so).

 

Hard vegetables: all peeled and chopped.

2 potatoes.

1 swede.

2 parsnips.

1 turnip.

4 carrots.

 

Softer vegetables:

2 onions, peeled and diced.

3 tomatoes, quartered.

A handful of dried tomatoes, chopped and soaked in a little water.

4 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped.

3 sticks celery, peeled and chopped.

3 peppers, de-seeded and chopped.

1 bulb fennel, chopped.

1 butternut squash, peeled, de-seeded and chopped.

1 heaped tablespoon thyme leaves.

1 heaped tablespoon chopped rosemary leaves.

Olive oil.

Salt and pepper.

 

Cut the vegetables to about fork-size – not tiny pieces nor great lumps!

Put the peeled hard vegetables in a pan, just covered in cold water, and simmer for about 5 minutes.  Drain.

Meanwhile, line a deep roasting tin with foil (to save on washing up) and mix in all the softer prepared vegetables with a tablespoon or so of oil, herbs and a good seasoning of salt and pepper.

Mix the parboiled vegetables and place on top of the roasting pan, seasoning again.

Drizzle over with a little more olive oil.

Cook Gas 4/180 C  for about 45 minutes before mixing again and returning to the oven for about 30 minutes.

Cooking times are flexible as it depends on the size of the pieces– test them with a knife.

By my reckoning this would give you about  half the different plant foods you need a week in one dish so some greens on other days plus fruit should about meet the target.  Freeze portions of the roast veg for future weeks so they are half done too!  You can vary the herbs and vegetables  according to season and to ring the changes.


Sticky to my elbows

 

Part of the fatigue management programme (see last posting) is about doing something each day just for fun and pleasure.

This week, it has been candied peel for the sous chef who has been making panettone, that tall Italian brioche-like bread.  Of course, being a man, he has to have all the right accoutrements down to the fancy cardboard case for the final rise and baking – with bamboo skewers inserted so that the edifice can be suspended upside down when it cools (avoids the soft creation collapsing).

Anyway, he wanted proper candied peel and, with Seville orange season upon us, I obliged and now have a stock for fruit cakes, Christmas puddings and gifts.

The actual work of this recipe is dead easy, doesn’t take much time but is spread out over about a week.  The really messy bit is taking the peel off the parchment paper, rolling in caster sugar and storing in boxes.  Even with several hand-washes, I was sticky everywhere and the floor needed a good mop through.  But the result was worth it all.

 

3 lb Seville oranges (or any citrus fruit)

1500g granulated sugar

Caster sugar for storing.

 

Cut the fruit in half and squeeze out all the juice.    I have a whizzy electric “lemon squeezer” which makes this very easy.  I used the juice in marmalade.

Remove any remnants of the flesh, pips etc. from the fruit halves.

Place the fruit halves in a pan, covered with water (weighed down with a plate if necessary).  Don’t use more water than needed.

Simmer for 1-2 hours until the peel is soft but not falling apart.

Add 500g sugar and stir gently over a low heat so that it dissolves without breaking up the peel.  Once dissolved, boil rapidly for 30 minutes.  Leave the peel in the syrup for 24 hours.

Repeat the addition of 500g sugar, dissolving, boiling, standing.

Repeat again.  By this time, the cold syrup should have reached the consistency of thick honey.

Gently warm the peel and syrup – just enough so that you can remove the peel from the syrup.

Place the drained peel on baking trays lined with parchment paper and place in the oven on the very lowest heat for 6 hours to dry as much as possible.  Leave in the oven until completely cool.

Put caster sugar into a bowl and roll each piece of peel in the sugar before placing in an airtight storage box, interleaving layers with parchment paper.  Add any remaining caster sugar to the layers to keep the peel separate.

I’ve stored peel like this for at least 12 months.

 

The remaining orange-flavoured sugar syrup and the caster sugar from the boxes can be used in puddings, baking, pannetone and next year’s marmalade.  Nothing wasted!

Visit to the physiotherapist

It was all a bit traumatic: still wary of being in a car since the accident; the first time in another enclosed space for many months;  having to go through all the injuries from nearly three years ago.  The final straw was the utterly awful blaring radio playing in the waiting room.

We were gratefully wafted aloft in the lift and I went through the now rather tedious litany of damage, pain and limitations.  A thorough inspection and a trio of exercises to practice over the next few weeks and we were out and back to the lift.

My trusty escort was mightily impressed that the Covid-secure precautions had extended to a plastic label over the call buttons to make cleaning easier.  But the lift refused to budge: the doors opened and shut; the announcement said “Going Down”; increasingly frantic button presses gained reaction but no descent.  The escort disappeared to investigate an alternative route via stairs.

The lift ping-ed, the doors opened and someone stepped out.  “Is it working?”  I asked and the engineer replied, “Not at the moment.  I’m servicing it.  There’s a sign on the buttons saying “Do Not Use” “.  But he relented and we went rather shame-faced on our way.

Two morals to this tale: don’t trust (male) partners to read even three-word instructions and please try to service lifts after disabled people have left the building.

Oriental-style duck.

1 duck breast (about 250g).

1 teaspoon honey.

1 flat teaspoon five spice mix.

A pinch each of salt and pepper.

A dash of soy sauce.

A portion of GGG.*

A tiny amount of oil.

 

Place all the ingredients except the oil in a bag and vacuum pack.

Place in a sous vide water bath or pan of water, ensuring the bag is submerged, and cook at 55C.

When cooking like this at a constant water temperature, the timing depends on how long the heat takes to penetrate the meat.  As the temperature is constant, the meat can be left in the water bath until you are ready for it – with this recipe, I’d left the duck in the sous vide for three hours although 45-60 minutes would probably be long enough.

Heat the oil in a frying pan and place the duck breast in it, skin side down.

Cook for about 5 minutes until the skin is browning and crisping.

Remove the duck and keep warm while it rests and then slice thinly to make two servings.

Meanwhile, pour all the liquid from the bag in to the pan and reduce to a syrupy sauce to pour over the duck.

 

  • GGG is 4 parts fresh root ginger (peeled and roughly chopped), 2 parts garlic (peeled) and 1 part green chillies (de-seeded). Put everything in a food processor and whizz to a rough paste.  Freeze in teaspoon portions and use in curries and oriental dishes.

 

 

Super Christmas present

 

If you haven’t received a Dutch dough whisk for Christmas, you just don’t know what you are missing!

This handy culinary tool was bestowed on our kitchen by friends Liz and Dave.  I suspect that it may be designed for somewhat looser yeasted batters but is also perfect with sourdough mixes.  Here’s the triumphant ‘hybrid’ sourdough recipe that produced both a baguette and batard (silent S):

200g Sourdough starter (fed within the last 24-48 hours).

7g dried organic yeast.

One teaspoon sugar.

About 350g warm water.

500g strong white bread flour.

250g wholemeal or other interesting bread flour.

10g salt.

A good slug of olive oil.

 

Mix the dried yeast with the sugar, a tablespoon of water and tablespoon of bread flour to make a liquid paste and leave in a warm place for an hour until fizzing.

Mix the bread flours and salt together, making a crater in the centre of the bowl.

Add the sourdough starter and fizzing yeast mix; fold the flour in to the centre adding more water and stir with your trusty Dutch dough whisk.

Add the olive oil.

Continue to mix by hand until the dough comes away from the sides of the bowl.

Turn the dough on to a floured surface and knead for about 10 minutes – the surface should spring back when pressed.

Return to a clean bowl  that has been lightly floured or sprayed with a little oil, cover and leave to rise in a cool place overnight until it’s doubled in size. The front porch is ideal!

Turn the dough on to a floured surface and press flat to expel all the air.

Divide the dough and shape for your containers.  Perhaps a proving basket for the batard and a baguette mould.

Cover and leave in a warm place until doubled in size. 

Preheat the oven to Gas 9  and place a roasting tin on the bottom.

Transfer the batard from the basket to a baking tray, dust with flour and slash surface with sharp knife.

Reduce the oven to Gas 7, place batard and baguette in to oven and pour a cup of water in to the hot roasting tin – watch out for instant steam.

Bake for 25 minutes and test if the bread is done: knock the bottom to hear if it sounds hollow or insert a probe thermometer which should reach 88-99C (more to the top end).

If necessary, turn the bread over and return to the oven for 5 minutes to finish cooking the base and centre.

Cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes before slicing.  Delicious with smoked salmon now that we have re-discovered the pack down the back of a fridge drawer – thankfully it is still in date!

 

Tip if some of your vegetables are looking weary: broccoli responds very well if the base of the stalk is sliced off and it is stood in a little water in the fridge for 12 hours or more – it becomes far more turgid as the water is taken up.  Cauliflower and cabbage are likely to respond too.

 

 

 

Ho, Ho, Ho!

 

Just when you thought it was safe to go out …

The frustration, rage and misery of all those truck drivers stuck at Dover is not the image we want to see just before everyone starts their Christmas holidays.  Here too, we will be in Tier 4 within days – but probably not making huge difference as I haven’t been in a shop for nearly a year – so the Christmas presents were somewhat sparse as on-line buying really doesn’t work if you are blind.  But at least I know that all the packages of preserves, home-made confectionery, cakes and more are all Covid-secure: they’ve been self-isolating for weeks.

Here’s a very simple Christmas roast fruit salad:

1 pineapple, cored, skin removed and cut in to mouth-size pieces (or open a tin).

2 eating apples , cored and chopped.

2 pears, cored and chopped.

2 bananas, peeled and chopped.

2 handfuls dried sultanas.

2 handfuls dates, chopped.

2 handfuls crystallised ginger, chopped.

2 oranges, zest and juice.

About half a pint apple or other fruit juice.

Optional spices: 1 inch cinnamon, 2 star anise, 4 cloves, 4 green cardamon pods.

Mix all the ingredients in an oven-proof bowl and cover with a double layer of foil.

Cook for 30 minutes at Gas 6 and a further couple of hours at Gas 1.

Serve hot or cold.  Reheats very well in the microwave and is a good alternative to Christmas pudding.

You can vary the fruit or add more – today’s version has a mango (peeled and chopped).

Wishing you all a very happy Christmas, a much improved New Year and very good health.

 

 

 

Ding Dong

Last of the Christmas decorations: three wreath rings and a turquoise tree to welcome friends popping in to exchange Christmas gifts.  Masked and distanced, it is very different to the usual party gatherings but worth it if we are all to be around next year.

More people are making special efforts to share Christmas treats: the superb “self-isolation choir” will be presenting their Nine Lessons and Carols this Sunday 20 December at 1700:

http://theselfisolationchoir.com/s/Christmas-at-Home-Poster.pdf

These talented amateur singers exude their enthusiasm and the authenticity of Christmas giving as they warble alone from their homes and create the splendid sound of the massed choir.  There is a voluntary ticket price of £5 to the charity FORGETMENOTCHORUS – further details in the link

I was especially treated for my birthday this week.  Friend and co-cook Karen created the super-decorated ginger birthday cake, great cooking pal John brought his Christmas Bakewell tart and I’d used the scrapings from our own Christmas cake to make a small birthday edition – topped with a mini-pile-of-presents I’d made in pewter.  Far too many calories too close to Christmas!

John was happy to share his recipe and I’m working on Karen.

John’s Christmas Bakewell Tart

For the pastry base:

125g butter.

250g plain flour.

50g icing sugar.

1 egg.

Rub the butter in to the flour and sugar before binding together with the beaten egg.

Roll out the pastry to line a deep flan case.

Cover the base with a layer of fruit mincemeat topped with glace cherries and flaked almonds.

For the filling:

175g margarine.

175g sugar.

200g self-raising flour.

3 eggs.

A generous tablespoon of good almond essence.

Whizz all the ingredients together in a food processor and pour into the flan case.

Bake at 160C Gas 4 for about an hour.

 

For the icing:

3 tablespoons icing sugar.

1 teaspoon almond essence.

1 teaspoon water.

Flaked almonds.

Mix the sugar, essence and water together to create a smooth and slightly runny icing.

Remove the tart from the flan case once cooled and pour over the icing, topping with the almonds.

 

This is a substantial and delicious alternative to other seasonal cakes and puddings – perfect for a last-minute addition to a Christmas buffet.

 

 

Winter cheer

The Not Forgotten Association  (www.thenotforgotten.org) Jingle Bells Rock drive-in entertainment and lunch at Southampton Airport was the highlight of this week.  It was covered by ITV local News.

We all sat in our socially-distanced cars with special speakers that blasted out the jollity of popular Christmas songs rendered by a stalwart and talented group of entertainers on the stage, battling the winter chill.  They had to be wildly determined and motivated as the only audience feedback was the hooting of car horns and waving of arms.  We and other veterans with health conditions and injuries from military service were welcomed with beakers of mulled wine (tea or coffee for the drivers) and fed a simple but delicious hog roast lunch.  Songs, dancing and hooting continued for a couple of hours, punctuated by silly games and a raffle.  The synchronised horn hooting to the “12 days of Christmas” was the fantastic finale.

As a blind person, the spectacle wasn’t so obvious but the sheer energy, enjoyment and happiness of the event was wonderful after nine months of hibernation.

For anyone else with little or no sight, there’s a possibility that a mobile phone and artificial intelligence could help you get around. See more on: www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/technology-55178066

Meanwhile, I’ve been re-making this simple lamb tajine https://youtu.be/z5YjvpvwVOg.  It is fragrant with spices, is not too hot and reheats perfectly from the freezer.

2 medium onions peeled and diced.

1 tablespoon oil.

2 portions GGG*.

500 g lamb, diced.

1 teaspoon turmeric.

1 teaspoon ground cumin.

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon.

1 teaspoon smoked paprika.

1 rounded teaspoon harissa.

500cl water.

1 handful stoned dates, chopped.

7 fresh tomatoes, chopped.

1 rounded tablespoon almonds, ground.

2 chicken stock pots/cubes.

A good squeeze tomato paste.

1 medium tin chick peas (240 gram, drained.

1 orange – zest and juice.

 

Sauté the onions in the oil until softening then add the GGG.

Add the lamb to the pan and sauté.

Add the spices and sauté for a minute or two until their fragrance can be smelled.

Add all remaining ingredients (except the orange juice and zest) and bring the pan to a very gentle simmer.

Cover and continue to cook over a very low heat (over a heat diffuser, in a very low oven, in a slow-cooker) until the lamb is tender and the tajine is unctuous (at least 2 hours and sometimes 5-10 hours depending on how you are cooking it).

Add the orange zest and juice before serving with couscous.

 

*GGG is 4 parts fresh root ginger, 2 parts garlic and 1 part green (or red) chilli.  Peel and de-seed and roughly chop before whizzing in to a rough paste in a food processor.  A portion is one teaspoonful.  I freeze portions in an ice-cube tray and then store in a box in the freezer.  Excellent for all curries too.

 

 

 

 

Goose getting fat?

 

The first two of the Christmas trees are now up and sparkling here, gifts are being wrapped and festive menus planned.  Christmas is just around the corner and let’s hope that the news of the roll-out of a vaccine is a gift for thousands.  It’s time to smile again – even behind your mask.

I’ve been reviving a classic country recipe from the Vendee. I first tasted this recipe in France with friends, Joan and Jeff: simple and hearty for a comforting lunch.  If you are having goose for Christmas, then it is worth saving some of the fat for this dish.  Alternatively, there are jars of both goose and duck fat around for roast potatoes so you could use what’s left-over.

In France, a boudin noir would be steamed on top of the mogettes (white beans).  My UK alternative of black pudding is close enough.

 

4 large handfuls of dried white haricot beans, soaked in water for at least 24 hours.

2 medium onions, peeled and diced.

2 carrots, peeled and diced.

4 sticks of celery, diced.

6 cloves garlic, peeled and diced.

1 tablespoon goose fat.

2 chicken or vegetable stockpots/cubes.

A good squeeze of tomato puree.

Half a glass of white wine.

2 stems rosemary, leaves removed and chopped.

3 sprigs thyme, leaves removed.

Black pudding

Apple puree.

 

Sauté the onions, celery, carrots and garlic in the goose fat until softening.

Add the drained beans (they will have become about 6 large handfuls).

Add enough water to cover plus the stockpots/cubes, tomato paste, wine and the herb leaves (about a tablespoonful).

Simmer very gently until the beans are soft (about 8 hours) when nearly all the liquid will have been absorbed and check seasoning – perhaps some pepper.

About half an hour before serving, place the black pudding on top of the beans to heat through.

Warm the apple puree in the microwave and place a spoonful on each plate – top with some black pudding.

Serve the beans alongside.

 

I brought the beans to a simmer and then put a heat diffuser between the pan and gas.  They cooked for five hours one day; were switched off overnight and re-simmered the next morning.  A pressure cooker (too terrifying for this blind person) would probably be quicker or, in desperation and at the cost of authenticity, a can of pre-cooked beans (NOT Baked Beans!) might do.

I tossed a diced courgette on top of the beans before the black pudding so I didn’t have to trouble with any more vegetables.

Be aware: this bean dish is long-winded in more than one sense!

 

 

Brightening up dull days

I wanted something warm to match my electric blue Crocks – and this madly exuberant leather and fur cape leapt out of the wardrobe.  It hasn’t seen the light of day for about 15 years since I bought it in Athens with friend and guide, Rosemary from Australia.  I even found matching gloves in one pocket and the original receipt in the other.  I am pleased to report that, even in those days, I’d driven a hard bargain and managed a great reduction!

Comments on the sartorial elegance are not needed please but it amused me and, hopefully, the neighbours.

Now: something very simple and not too calorific so that you can get in shape for those Christmas treats.

3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped.

400g mushrooms, sliced.

2 tablespoons olive oil.

Salt and ground black pepper.

Freshly grated parmesan cheese  (optional)

7 handfuls pasta shells.

200g fresh spinach leaves, washed and any hard stalks removed.

 

While the hot water comes to a simmer for the pasta, gently sauté the garlic and mushrooms – season with salt and ground black pepper.

When the water is boiling, add 3 handfuls of pasta shells per person and one for the pot.

Add the spinach to the mushrooms and sauté they start to wilt.

Drain the pasta and return to the pan, adding the mushrooms and spinach.

Mix well and serve in hot bowls with a seasoning of parmesan .

 

This makes an excellent hot lunch for a winter’s day for two people.  I give the parmesan a  miss as cheese gives me migraines  and I can’t bear the smell!  Any pasta will do but shells are good for holding the mushrooms and garlic.  We’d eaten  the lot before we remembered to take a photo!