Secrets of living with blindness

Maribel from Melbourne down-under shares her survival tips https://youtu.be/cX8dvHsuamE.      But her ideas go way beyond blindness and can be used by anyone facing a life-changing event – not just a disability.

 

 

 

 

 

Her secrets are:

 

Acceptance.    Accepting whatever it is you have to cope with – not avoiding, hiding or denying the situation, tough as that sounds.

Collaboration.  Letting other people help you.

Courage.  You do have to be brave to face life again.

Organisation.  Vital for blindness but key too for other major life changes.

Sense of humour.  Being able to laugh at yourself and with other people re-builds relationships.

Sense of intuition.  Trust your instincts about what is right for you.

Use all your senses.  Vital for a visually impaired person but equally important for everyone: it’s a richer life when you experience every sensation  and live in the moment.

I can recognise all of Maribel’s secrets and and recommend them to anyone facing a life crisis.  It might not be possible to tackle every one of these at once but they do provide a pathway for the future.

Since Maribel and I met, she has gone from strength to strength: publishing her memoire and getting her new guide dog, Dindi.  She’s also spreading her ideas wider afield on Australian breakfast TV and through her podcasts:

Cooking ‘Blind’ on Sydney TV

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyCwxaXdRX4&feature=youtu.be

Podcast: Cooking in a Tactile Kitchen ABC Radio Part 1 (14 mins)

https://maribelsteel.com/listen-to-cooking-blind-in-a-tactile-kitchen/

Podcast: Cooking in a Tactile Kitchen ABC Radio Part 2 (14 Mins)

https://maribelsteel.com/listen-to-cooking-blind-in-a-tactile-kitchen-part-2/

 

Penny

http://www.bakingblind.com

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Maribel is another great blind cook

Maribel is another great blind cook: see us making her mother’s classic Spanish dish of eggs à la flamencohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9OnaZzQTkI&feature=youtu.be in her sunny Melbourne home.

Maribel maribelsteel.com was a driving force behind my baking Blind trip to Australia, and we had a fabulous time cooking together, sharing laughs and songs plus our ideas about living with blindness.

Not only a great cook and singer, Maribel is already a published author, speaker, blogger and general all-round entrepreneurial woman who is unstinting in sharing her own experiences.  We talked about why people who can’t see still want to choose the colour of their clothes.  On that day, quite by chance, we were both wearing red and she had even chosen crockery to match!  My coordinated luggage definitely came up second-best.  But, since then, I’ve tried to go one better and now have a red cane too – who wants a boring white one?

I hope that this little video gives an insight into life with a disability.  There were just two women having fun together, totally unfazed by their blindness, completely competent and capable.

The dish would make a perfect brunch: simple ingredients of garlic, onion, peppers, tomatoes and chorizo sausage gently sautéed before sharing between individual dishes that were each topped with a fresh egg before oven-baking.  You don’t really need a recipe for something so straightforward. 

We ended the morning on her sunny balcony, enjoying the sounds and smells of the city.  Maribel and her partner, Harry, broke into a song that summed up our thinking: “Everything’s going to be alright!”

Chefs and cooks champion diversity.

I set out to use cooking to change attitudes towards blindness and other disabilities – and China showed me how well this works.  Last week with aboriginal Fred, simply cooking a fish together was a bridge between our very different cultures.  This week, gastronomically diverse Melbourne showed that great cooks and chefs aren’t constrained by issues of race, nationality, ethnicity, disability, gender or other false barriers: food is all about generosity, sharing, learning from each other, crossing culinary borders and using the best ideas and ingredients, whatever their source.   The Greek “Euro Bites” eatery was a prime example (www.eurobites.com.au).

It was a special treat to encounter new ingredients and equipment:  gastronome Charlene (https://www.facebook.com/charlene.trist)  used smoked fresh eggs in both the pasta and the filling of her ravioli dish – these eggs have long shelf-life and would be ideal in a savoury soufflé, kedgeree and much more.  The Chef’s Hat emporium (www.chefshat.com.au) offered every sort of cooking equipment.  Food writer Dani (www.danivalent.com) introduced me to the widely popular Thermomix to produce fluffily delicious bread rolls in under an hour.    I’d been rather sceptical about the prospect of just filling an éclair until I spent time with Dre, an amazingly entrepreneurial pastry chef who is already expanding her patisserie and restaurant empire (www.bibelot.com.au).  Maribel, who is also blind (www.maribelsteel.com), was utterly inspirational: already a published writer and travel blogger, she is a wonderful cook, singer and champion for visually impaired people – you can hear her and partner Harry (www.springstudio.com.au) on the Melbourne video.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We were hosted by the Bostock family: another link to the Royal Navy and James Holman (after whom the prize that is funding me is named).  Former Royal Navy Commander Colin also arranged for me to spend a morning with the Australian Defence Force catering and hospitality trainees at Holmesglen college (www.holmesglen.edu.au) – another military reminder.  The Bostocks were unstinting in their generosity and friendship while daughter Sarah shared her knowledge on indigenous culture.

Following that trail, we moved on to Perth to meet up with Lynda, a former Women’s Royal Naval Service officer, who took us to the Maalinup aboriginal art gallery and bush tucker garden (www.www.maalinup.com.au) to meet artist PhilNarkle (www.philnarkle.com.au).  Now we have some small authentic artefacts to share with those who can only follow our adventures from afar.

And great news on the Australian equality agenda: a strong turn-out has just voted Yes to same-sex marriage: the people have spoken!

All of this is part of my adventure cooking around six continents funded by the international Holman prize run by San Francisco’s LightHouse for the Blind.  You can see the short composite videos we post at the end of each visit and, when we have had a chance to edit all the material back in the UK, we will be posting all the cooking sessions and recipes in the New Year.

Malawi next – if South African Airways can find an aircraft that works (we have a 24 hour delay in Perth)

Penny