Summer perfection: a good read and ice-cream

Crime fiction, thrillers and spy stories have tended to feature in my book reviews for RNIB.   Not the most literary or spiritually uplifting but great for relaxing in the sun (when it shows its face again).

My latest selection goes live on RNIB Connect radio from 1300 on Friday 9 July – just click  https://audioboom.com/posts/7898711-alex-michaelides-kate-london-penny-melville-brown

I’ve also been telling the international audience of the British Forces Broadcasting Service https://fb.watch/v/9uSZ3flrF/

about next Monday’s 1030 (London time) live on-line bake-in: the 9-minute microwave ginger cake.

https://www.facebook.com/events/806006046955175

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/baking-session-for-visually-impaired-people-ginger-cake-tickets-160566860803

This honey and ginger ice-cream is the perfect accompaniment for both the good book and the cake.   It grew from a Heston Blumenthal recipe: substituting honey for sugar to give more flavour and slightly changing the consistency.   Ideal for those who can’t eat eggs and very easy.   Keeping the pieces of ginger as a topping avoids overwhelming the subtle honey flavour.

My venerable and elderly ice-cream maker has an integral refrigeration unit.  But you could part-freeze the mix for an hour or so before whisking the semi-frozen mix to break up the ice crystals and returning to the freezer.

 

840g double or whipping cream.

360g whole milk.

200g honey (we use our own).

35g semi-skimmed milk powder.

3 teaspoons vanilla paste.

Pinch of salt.

2 handfuls crystallised ginger, chopped.

 

Simply place all the ingredients except the ginger in a pan and gently heat until all is dissolved and mixed.   Briefly bring to boiling point.

Chill for at least two hours (or overnight).

Churn and top with the chopped ginger before serving or placing in the freezer.

How’s that for simple?

 

Over-confident

No cooking this time: last week’s injury has turned into this week’s spiral fracture of the fifth metacarpal in my right hand which is now encased in a splint for the next month.

It has massive impact: can’t use my white cane so difficult getting out; can’t guide myself around indoors; difficult to eat other than with a spoon and not good at finding my mouth with it in my left hand – more clothes in the wash; laptop keyboard almost impossible as two-finger typing only works when you can see the keys!  Resorting to incomprehensible dictation on my phone.

Thank goodness for a well-stocked freezer and a well-trained sous chef!

All due to over-confidence: moving too fast and missed the wall.

Was glad of the help of the Gosport (death) hospital for x-ray, first splint and discreet check that the injury wasn’t the result of domestic abuse.  First splint was like two conjoined finger puppets.  But would have welcomed a bit more empathy from the follow-up phone call.  No further treatment but another bigger splint in the post and that’s the end of their interest.

Still going ahead with the 12 April live bake-in and did a short interview with RNIB radio https://audioboom.com/posts/7835352-join-this-virtual-bake-in-event-for-visually-impaired-people.

The sous chef will be doing all the grunt work for the lemon Victoria sponges.

 

Ginger biscuits go global.

Well, not quite, but I couldn’t resist the alliteration!  In fact, I’ve been doing live on-line bake-ins for blind students in both Hertfordshire and San Francisco this week.

The Brits wanted some tips about baking so I explained my only two items of “blind” equipment: talking scales and thermometer.  For any of these talking items, I strongly recommend auditioning them before buying because some of the voices are distinctly slurred, rather transatlantic and somewhat abrupt.  My oldest scales are my favourite: he says “Hello” when turned on and “Goodbye” when his button’s pressed.

The san Francisco group liked the recipe too but I had to explain our golden syrup – it is not so easily available over there and our British self-raising flour becomes their all-purpose version with some baking soda.  They wanted to know more about my time in the Navy and why I joined.  And they seemed to like the tales of derring-do from the global cooking tour too.  It was another chance to promote all my hundreds of Baking Blind videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWTJYx7jGA3xaR4830wJSRg?view_as=subscriber

In turn, they gave me a sense of what life is like in California in the midst of the Covid pandemic.  It sounds very similar to here: lots of confusing messages from governments, lives limited by lockdowns and the particular problems of blind people who might often rely on someone else to guide them.  It is impossible to maintain social distancing when you need to hold someone’s arm or can’t see the one-way signs or floor markings when out either.

These Covid challenges were also part of the discussion during an interview  I did with RNIB Connect radio (broadcast on 8 July at 1100 – but there’s catch-up too: http://www.rnibconnectradio.org.uk/> Twitter @RNIB Radio).  The pandemic is creating some extra challenges for disabled people as we try to navigate our way through Government guidelines  so please give us a bit of leeway.

Here’s the ginger biscuit recipe in case you missed it last time:

50g butter.

50g sugar (white, golden or brown).

50g golden syrup or honey.

100g self-raising flour (or 100g all-purpose flour plus half a teaspoon baking soda).

1 heaped teaspoon ground ginger (about 5g).

Heat the oven to Gas 4, 350F, 175C

Melt the butter, sugar and syrup in a pan, stirring to check the sugar has dissolved.  Allow to cool.

Put the flour and ginger in a bowl and pour in the butter and sugar mix, scraping the pan clean and using the scraper to start mixing the dough.

Finish the dough with your hands,  forming  it into 10 small balls, rolling them between your palms.

Line a baking tin with baking parchment and place the balls on it about 2 inches apart, gently pressing down each ball a little.

Cook for 12-15 minutes.  The biscuits should feel firm to touch and will crisp further as they cool.