To peel or not to peel?

I’m talking about celery, of course.  Flamboyant TV chef Keith Floyd was an ardent peeler but Rich from Virginia Beach couldn’t see the point as you can see and hear (https://youtu.be/VjSOY1REX-A).

For my part, I prefer to peel off the “whiskers” from the outside of a stick of celery whether I’m serving raw in a Waldorf salad or cooked in a casserole or sauté.

Former US Navy Beachmaster Rich presented us with his “treasure of the sea” rockfish that is popular in Virginia Beach, on the Atlantic East coast of America.  We cooked the 1.68 lb whole fish on his Webber barbecue for 14 minutes – times will vary with different barbecues and different sized fish.   Keeping the flavouring simple meant that the flavour of the fish shone through but was also perfumed by the apple wood smoke.

Meanwhile, we had the whole celery debate, much to the delight of his non-cooking wife, Cathy.  The vegetable sauté featured the multi-coloured heirloom carrots and the yellow Yukon potatoes, flecked with green spinach and the golden chicken stock.  Rich had made his own stock from chicken carcases and was rather more receptive to my idea of roasting the bones before making the stock.

We were two true enthusiasts sharing our passion for kitchen gadgets: rich showed me his garlic slicer, lemon squeezer, two types of peelers, his knife sharpener, the glass loaf pans and his superb sauté pan.  Each item had been carefully considered and practically tested – not just the latest fad that sits at the back of the kitchen drawer for years!

It was a real delight to find someone as passionate about cooking who really knew what he was doing from practical experience and not just reading recipe books.

Penny

 

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Long distance love.

The comfortable companionship of cooking together can be the perfect ingredient for sharing life stories.  Amidst potato peeling and pan stirring in Virginia Beach (USA), I heard all about Kate’s love story and more (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDpWGy_FYpo&t=1s ).

While we struggled to skin recalcitrant puppydrum fish for our classic English fish pie, Kate told me about re-discovering her childhood sweetheart after years of separation and her boldness in moving across the Atlantic to create a new future with him.  You can hear her happiness and enthusiasm for her completely new life.  Not just a new country and relationship but she’s also created a new business too.  Having developed a range of natural skin-care treatments to manage her own sensitivity to commercial products, she has a growing market for her range of hand-crafted preparations.  See more on her Facebook page Simple Luxury Skin Care and you can contact her for a menu of products.

And the kitchen revelations didn’t stop there.  The local Virginian Pilot journalist covering our Baking Blind cooking session shared her own struggle with the onset of sight loss.  Just as I’d had to face such a life-changing situation two decades ago, she was having to learn new ways of working using some of the special adaptations, equipment and adjustments to her professional work.  She is another shining example of how determination wrapped around the right amount of help can mean that acquiring a disability needn’t be career-ending.

And, meanwhile, Kate and I continued to struggle with the local puppydrum fish.  Locally caught especially for our fish pie dish, it nearly proved more than a match for us when trying to remove the exceptionally tough skin.  On the other hand, it might have been so much easier if I’d realised it needed doing before cutting the fish up!  Just one of those kitchen dramas that happen when you are blind.  But it was still a delicious dish that, amazingly, seems very little known in America – the “old” country still has some traditional secrets to share with them.  You can try the recipe too (http://www.bakingblind.com/fish%20pie.htm) for a simple home supper or vamped up with more luxurious ingredients to delight guests.

Penny

 

 

 

Naval connections: nearly a cure for our blindness?

probationery third officer melville brown WRNSFellow naval officer James Holman and I both lost our sight due to uveitis.  But he became blind some 200 years ago when women stayed at home while their menfolk were at sea – often for years.  Could he have imagined that the Women’s royal Naval Service would be formed some 100 years later?  And we have gone from strength to strength: last October I celebrated 100 years of Wrens with an outstanding lunch in Virginia Beach (USA) and you can share those great party food recipes (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WmTqhC6N7Q&t=8s).

But, back to that shared eye condition.  The cause seems to be that our immune systems attack our own bodies causing the inflammation and damage.  But now there’s possible hope on the way.  This week I was at Moorfield’s eye hospital in London as, potentially, the only UK patient that might be able to take part in the first stage of research by the French Eyevensys biotech company.

They are investigating whether their gene-therapy can cause cells in the eye to produce an anti-inflammatory protein to fight the disease.  I learned that it has already achieved positive pre-clinical results. The medication is delivered in to the eye through a fine needle   but a key innovation is the use of tiny electrical impulses (electro transfer) which, although evaluated for other treatments, hasn’t yet been used on the eye.  The idea is that the treatment stimulates the body to become its own factory creating the answer to the condition.

For me, there was no prospect of any improvement to my sight but perhaps I could help others with the condition by testing whether this process could reduce doses and frequency of injections.  I wasn’t worried whether I would see again or not – but more about the practical implications of taking part in the trial.  It would have been good to support the hospital after they have cared for me for over 20 years.

But I was too optimistic: both my eyes have too much damage to their structure.  It would be impossible to monitor any consequences of the treatment – it would truly be a blind study!  I was sad not to be able to help but glad that my needle-phobia wouldn’t be put to the test!

Wouldn’t it have been wonderful, having won the prize commemorating James Holman, to have contributed to an answer to the condition that blinded him?  There’s more about him and the prize run by San Francisco’s LightHouse organisation at (www.lighthouse-sf.org).

Meanwhile, lack of sight didn’t hold him back -or me so you can enjoy the salmon recipe on my website: www.bakingblind.com.

Penny

Wrens know how to organise.

The volume climbed at the WRNS 100 centenary lunch party while it took minimum effort to put together a great chicken dish to feed the crowd– see how we did it (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMp_N573JSA).

Jo, my old naval colleague, took our week in Virginia Beach, USA, by the scruff of the neck and shook it until every minute was completely occupied.  She produced a programme with military precision having co-opted a corps of collaborative cooks all ready to create their culinary magic on camera.

During one short week we managed to pack in four different sorts of bread, soup, three different fish dishes, party chicken, two desserts and the most peculiar “overnight casserole” that turned out to be a strange savoury bread-and-butter pudding!  Amidst all of this, we caught a glimpse of Virginia Beach and the huge naval base at Norfolk, managed another lunch party and a great Mexican welcome dinner.  It took all my stamina to keep up with the tight schedule but it was superb to meet so many other enthusiastic cooks.  But there was no stopping Jo: she kept teaching her Pilates classes, taking her exercise sessions and even managed to pack in a country music concert – I just tried to catch up on sleep!

Penny

Safe haven from storm violence.

Tropical Storm Nate turned a long difficult drive across Costa Rica in to a scary six hour ordeal of white-knuckled battle with flooded roads, wind-tossed debris and torrential rain.    Undaunted, and probably foolishly, we carried on to reach the capital city, San Jose, so you can see this masterclass (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BD1cHjsQogs) of home-cooked Costa Rican dishes by professional chef Mario. Finding him was tricky in the dark and awful weather and, as is usual in Costa Rica, no address: you just have to phone your host and they come to find you!

His kitchen was a haven of peace after all the hours of storm noise – and it quickly filled with the gentler sounds and smells of cooking.   It was just blissful to relax with a glass of wine and excellent simple food expertly cooked after a difficult day.

And the following morning was just as tricky.  I’d been planning a farewell kitchen session with the Costa Rican association of blind people in the capital’s top cookery school.  But we found that the city had been closed down as the government warned everyone to stay inside due to the continuing storm.  We heard from contacts in the UK that flights to San Jose were cancelled and began to wonder if we would be able to fly out the following day.

The hotel only offered a breakfast buffet so videographer toby went on a scavenging hunt to secure enough food and water for the day, in case the situation got even more risky.

Thank goodness the weather was rather calmer next day and the flight out was possible.  But, after all the drama and fabulous food of costa rica, we would have preferred our last memories to have been better  than the rather dry sandwiches and warm water of our final meal there.  If you want Western comforts mixed with life on the wild side, Costa Rica is just perfect – but perhaps better outside the rainy season!

Penny

Digging out dinner guests

Guests lost in the jungle and bogged down in mud was the drama of my second dinner service at Noam’s HiR restaurant in Tamarindo, Costa Rica.  Although late, dinner succeeded and you can see how I turned classic Victoria sponges in to more exotic desserts with chilli and coriander https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyAYELsPtgo

In the rainy season, the jungle roads are treacherous with pot holes, mud and torrents of water.  Our missing dinner guests were marooned only a few hundred yards away but their car was stuck in the mud.  Chef Noam dashed out with other guests in tow.    He was as handy with a pick-axe as with his chef’s knife and, within minutes, they soggily joined the party.  This was service with a difference!  As they say in Costa Rica, Pura vida – the answer to everything.

This whole week had been wonderful for discovering new foods growing wild in the jungle:

  • Okinawa spinach – green on one side and purple on the other.
  • Mayan tree spinach – which is toxic when uncooked.
  • Turmeric plants with large leaves – just dig out some roots to use.
  • Ginger plants with thin strap leaves for a light ginger taste and the roots/bulbs of ginger emerging from underground and to be cut.

And every home needs cleaner ants.  They rid houses of other insects and animals.  But they do bite humans too.  They don’t eat our food but will get rid of cockroaches and even something as large as a scorpion.  So you need to know which ant is which and keep the good ones.

Penny

Blind cook fails with simplest recipe!

Creating completely new dishes in Noam’s tiny original jungle kitchen was a challenge from the start: strange ingredients, unfamiliar equipment, the pressure of a seven course dinner menu for paying guests.  It was all made even trickier by the heat and deluges of rain plus the complete lack of water inside!  You can see the video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CirMoelCNVg) of my struggles.

I took the easy course with citrus tartlets using lemon mandarinos in place of the classic lemons.  Driver/trainee doctor Victor squeezed all the juice while I got on with the pastry which, of course, was baked blind using balls of kitchen foil to keep the tartlets in shape.

That first night there was a party of nine Americans celebrating a birthday at Noam’s HiR restaurant. The jungle was filled by their music and laughter while the tin roof above their heads rang with the torrents of rain.

Noam and I juggled our way through each course’s complicated elements without any obvious mishaps or delays.  The result was a very happy group of diners, clean plates and tantalised palates – few had encountered anything similar before!

But my attempt at meringues to top the tartlets was a complete disaster: every time I added the sugar, the whisked egg whites collapsed – it was probably the pervading dampness.  I did manage to produce sweet egg white pancakes which, when topped with the lemon mandarino sorbet plus the mangostan sauce and segments, just about passed muster.  The trick was to sound confident and convincing that this had been the plan all along!

Penny